Sukha – Day Five – Offcuts make the strongback accurate

I spent last night working out exactly how to layout the three backbone pieces correctly, while maximizing the efficiency of my plywood.

I’m not sure this will make sense.  Here is how the backbone pieces fit to the bottom of the boat:

That white piece is the FRONT BACKBONE, with the two blue REAR BACKBONEs just behind.

In the upper right hand corner are two sheets of plywood, at just over 100 bucks each.  Note that RB-A is cut in two pieces.  The largest uses a full length of plywood at 2438mm.  I then cut the remaining RB-A pieces from the end of the second sheet and butt scarf them together for a total of 2967mms.  With the remaining plywood on that second sheet, I am able to cut out the two FRONT BACKBONE pieces out and join them.  With all this, I still have useable plywood left from both sheets.

Note that I have saved the curved offcuts and use them as supports that will help me to lay out the bottom of the boat in the right shape to match the bottom of the backbones.  When I laid out the backbone pieces I was sure to add 53mm to the bottom of the offcuts, which will allow me to mount them on the strongback, which I’ve done in the image above.  I’ll lay out the plywood for the bottom on those.

Here is an image that shows the bottom laid on a different way, but it gives you an idea.  Using these offcuts assures everything will fit together perfectly. The curve of the bottom of the boat now watches the curve of the backbone pieces. Instead of using support pieces, as drawn below, I use the offcuts.

Today and tomorrow I help a long-time friend with his doctor appointments for a hip replacement. I’ve known this guy for forty years and I must say we are surprised how quickly we grow old together!  I’ll add more to this page as I complete some boat work later today.  IF I do any more!

Reminder: Guiclémanac’h is the name of the design.  Sukha is the name of this particular boat.  Sukha is easier/possible to say, so I’ll mostly write Sukha.  Click here to see all posts.

The original plans call for the boat to be 4.5 meters.  Yann Quenet, the designer, also drew up a set with the total length at 5 meters.  Follow the YANN link to see the plans page.  Reminder, the plan details assume you are a professional builder on this design.  I understand his others do not.

The first build was done by Alexandre Badri.  Thanks to Bateaux (check this link for a story about this boat) for the use of their images.  I’ll always try to link to their article. Let’s give them some traffic as a thank you.  And Alexandre, wow, you do nice work!

 

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